What is up with “Divas and Cocktails?”

What is up with “Divas and Cocktails?”

You know at a website called Interrace Today, we’re down with the brown, cool with my Jewish brothers and sisters, and hip with all my Asian followers.

We recently ran across a series on YouTube-land called “Divas and Cocktails,” (two things you typically don’t want to mix together and then be around, now). We’re still trying to figure the videos out.

Here we have a nice little video of some yentas (um, excuse me) reality TV sistas discussing spouses appearing on their programs.

Black Women, Black Hair, Interracial Dating

Uh-huh, you know he did, girl!

“Whatever you have that’s not on a solid foundation is going to collapse when it’s under a miscroscope,” amen, Sister.

Sistergirl Devotional Reading

Carol Mackey, author of Sistergirl Devotionals Keeping Jesus in the Mix  is here giving a reading from her new book at a Harlem bookstore.

Let us know what you think of Sister Carol, her stories and journey of Editor of Black Expressions Book Club to speaker/writer.

Carol Mackey, Joy Bramble, Linda Duggins, and ...

Carol Mackey, Joy Bramble, Linda Duggins, and Victoria Christopher Murray (Photo credit: mosaicbooks)

6 Lessons Learned from Interracial Dating

6 Lessons Learned from Interracial Dating

I recently came across a post on a site called I Am Not the Nanny.com. Yeah, I don’t get the joke, either, but I enjoyed the piece on interracial dating and agreed with much of it. Anyone who dares to date, (much less open themselves up emotionally and intellectually to the point where they can fall in love) outside their “race” you have to admire (at least we do at Interrace Today). 271185652_80_80

It’s a cute piece but one that can also be encouraging and uplifting to some. So, here’s the link to the piece on her perspective toward interracial dating. What do you think about her points and do you agree? Have you had similar experiences out there?

Time Magazine Covers Interracial Romance Novels

Time Magazine Covers Interracial Romance Novels

Time magazine, one of the great old stalwarts of publishing, (which I believe is now strictly online) has published an article on the prevalence and popularity (hence profitability) of steamy interracial romance novels.Don't hate the player, hate the game.

In the article, a black man is pictured smiling as a lusting blonde-haired, blue-eyed young woman is lunging toward him, pulling his jacket lapels. Good for him.

Are there steamy interracial romance novels out there for black women open-minded enough to consider interracial dating or eventual marriage? Or for that matter, Asian men who might be “down with the brown?” Or gay interracial steamy romance novels for that matter for our gay brothers and sisters out there?

At any rate, according to this piece, (and the articles below), interracial steamy romance novels (and yes, I do have to use all of words together every time) are catching on big time, so to us, that’s a positive sign.

Aïda

Aïda (Photo credit: xof). I see a future contestant on “The Face.”

What do you think? Is this a good thing (how could it be otherwise)? Do you read steamy interracial love/romance novels? Have you ever written one or are you writing one? Do you publish or self-publish them? Let us know!

Remembering Amiri Baraka

Remembering Amiri Baraka

Say what you wish about Amiri Baraka. He was (and always will be) a controversial lightning rod. At times brilliant, then later controversial or unclear as to motive; always defiant, and always being true to himself and his voice…always standing up for what he believed in regardless of whomever followed along.

Who else but Amiri Baraka would have had the testicular fortitude to write poetry about 9/11 (within hours of the events), calling it immediately, pointing fingers boldly at who stood to profit the most?

Amiri Baraka - RIP

Amiri Baraka – RIP (Photo credit: Professor Bop)

I was fortunate enough to have met Amiri Baraka (along with Nikki Giovanni) a long time ago while in college, and was struck by Baraka’s delivery and passion. We shook hands and his gaze met my own equally, proudly. He didn’t condescend and he didn’t play a role. He was, good or bad, the real deal at all times and always worth listening to.

So, it’s with a heavy heart that I learned of his passing.  I don’t know if he was glad to go or not, but he certainly did what he could while here.